This issue of our pasta newsletter opens with Storie di Pasta, a book by Martina Liverani, the soul of Dispensa. I like the title. It’s essential and conveys a strong sense of story and broadmindedness because there can be stories that are rooted in the past, and others that literally go beyond. What’s important, is that pasta is a unifying element.

Another significant input is given by Gabriele Zanatta, without whom this newsletter could not exist, given his attention and curiosity. Gabriele reminds me that many protagonists, here and in the future issues, are and will be young chefs, some not yet 30. They are, with their restaurants, some of the new features in the latest edition of the Guida di Identità Golose.

We’re facing a very significant generational change, just like in the middle of the last decade when in Milan, in January 2005, the first edition of Identità took place and it had been clear for a few years already that there were new figures about to grow.

Paolo Marchi
Content by Gabriele Zanatta

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Monograno Felicetti 
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Newsletter 63 del 16 december 2017

Dear {{NOME}},

This issue of our pasta newsletter opens with Storie di Pasta, a book by Martina Liverani, the soul of Dispensa. I like the title. It’s essential and conveys a strong sense of story and broadmindedness because there can be stories that are rooted in the past, and others that literally go beyond. What’s important, is that pasta is a unifying element.

Another significant input is given by Gabriele Zanatta, without whom this newsletter could not exist, given his attention and curiosity. Gabriele reminds me that many protagonists, here and in the future issues, are and will be young chefs, some not yet 30. They are, with their restaurants, some of the new features in the latest edition of the Guida di Identità Golose.

We’re facing a very significant generational change, just like in the middle of the last decade when in Milan, in January 2005, the first edition of Identità took place and it had been clear for a few years already that there were new figures about to grow.

Paolo Marchi
Content by Gabriele Zanatta

Storie di Pasta – stories of pasta, of men and women

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You cultivate pasta, you build it and finally share it. This is the lesson that comes from “Storie di Pasta” the book published by Dispensa with Monograno Felicetti. It is a gift for all those who buy the 8th issue of Dispensa online (the volume on the left, in the photo), 21 euros plus shipping.

The project is based on an idea by Martina Liverani, founder and curator of the magazine dedicated to “food and people”, with the support of the beautiful photos by Stefano Scatà and the content, in two languages, by industry professionals such as Camilla BaresaniMichele Lupi or Elisia Menduni.

The pasta factory analysed in depth is that of Felicetti in Predazzo, with Riccardo Felicetti acting as guide. He’s the man who moved the centre of gravity of high quality dry pasta to the mountains of Lagorai and Latemar, above Val di Fiemme. He’s the author of three small revolutions: the organic conversion in the Nineties; betting on mono-varietal products, the engine behind the Monograno line, and the involvement of some of the greatest fine dining authors of our days, from Davide Scabin to Norbert Niederkofler and Carlo Cracco

The most brilliant intuition, as finely explained in the book, has to do with the value of sharing, the fil rouge in the third part of the book. Camilla Baresani points it out. She’s the author of a nice story on the spreading of this food in the United States. But Pasta means pasta not just in Boston and San Diego but all around the world, as proven by Luca Fantin and Matteo Monti and many more chefs involved in the book.

Pasta "minesciata" by Floriano Pellegrino

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The dish in the photo is Linguine with toasted bone marrow and red fruits by Floriano Pellegrino, chef at Bros in Lecce, the author, together with pastry chef Isabella Potì of a lesson at Identità Naturali on organic pasta, in the coming congress in Milan (3rd-5th March 2018).

The dry pasta dishes in the menu in Lecce are neither cooked in the Neapolitan way, or as risotto, but minesciate: «My grandmother», says the chef, «used to make the sauce and then she would add it to the cooked pasta, a solution that at the restaurant allows us to have a consistent offer». A basic technique that can be applied in different ways, as in the dish in the photo, «as well as with the Linguine with cauliflower and horseradish which are later mixed with agro di riso, a dish that is similar to our pasta with ricotta. Or Spaghetto Felicetti minesciato in a sort of olive consommé, thickened with kuzu and finished with a very bitter rocket oil».

More than technique, what’s essential is the work these terrific guys from Salento are doing with flavours: «We’re exploring our taste background. The taste buds of our territory, the strongest element, the one that can really set us apart from global homologation. In Salento, this means bitter, vinegary, sour, brackish, rancid, savoury flavours». Therefore the menu at Bros is not divided according to classic courses, but in four macro-areas of taste. A quadruple-partition that has pasta as its fundamental chapter, as we’ll see in Milan.

Cristoforo Trapani, a stroll in Forte dei Marmi

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Cristoforo Trapani, chef at restaurant Magnolia inside hotel Byron in Forte dei Marmi (Lucca) will be among the speakers at Identità di Pasta during Identità Milano 2018. He will discuss pasta with tomato sauce as a dessert. Today, however, he speaks of Mischiato delicato. «It’s the dish I hold dearest, and so do our clients in Versilia. As with almost all my dishes, the starting point is memory. In this case, Pasta wuth beans and mussels from my youth and my homeland, Campania, to which I added my present on the Tuscan coast».

Mischiato delicato, clams, arselle from Viareggio, maruzzelle and schiaccioni beans from Pietrasanta

Recipe for 10 people

Ingredients
for the pasta
700 g mischiato napoletano
1 kg clams
fish stock made from the shells
2 garlic cloves
4 parsley stalks

for the shells
1 garlic clove
7 parsley stalks
1 kg clams

for the aromatic oil
500 g extra virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove
2 dry red chilli
thyme, sage and rosemary (a sprig each)

for the cream of schiaccioni beans
250 g beans
1 carrot
1 stalk of celery
½ onion
100 g extra virgin olive oil aromatised with thyme, sage and rosemary

Method
for the shells
In a large pan, heat the oil, with garlic and parsley stalks. When it’s hot, gradually add the clams and cover with a lid. Toast them for a few seconds, then add a ladle of water, and cover again. Once the shells are open, carefully filter the resulting water which you’ll use to cook the pasta and remove the seafood from the shells making sure there are no fragments of shell left.

for the aromatic oil
Garlic, oil and chilli pepper: put 100 g of extra virgin olive oil, half a head of garlic and 2 chilli peppers cut into pieces into a vacuum bag. Thyme, sage and rosemary: put 300 g of extra virgin olive oil, a sprig of sage, one of thyme and one of rosemary into a vacuum bag. Put the bags in a steam oven at 80 °C for 45 minutes. Bring it to room temperature and filter keeping the herbs aside.

for the cream of beans
Soak the beans overnight. Drain the water and rinse them properly. Brown a vegetable mirepoix, add beans and water and boil them. Blend using a Bimby processor with a little cooking water. Add salt and strain. Emulsify with 100 g of extra virgin olive oil aromatised with thyme, sage and rosemary. 

Cooking
Bring the seafood stock to the boil, add the pasta and cook al dente. Mix with 100 g of extra virgin olive oil, garlic and chilli pepper and 200 g of oil, thyme, sage and rosemary, adding clams and maruzzelle and then season with pepper. Aside, warm up the bean sauce.

Dishing out
The cream of beans goes on the bottom, the pasta on top. Decorate with parsley sauce.

Sisti and spaghetti from Riccione to Milan

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The basic idea of Federico Sisti, chef from Romagna working at Ronchettino, on the outskirts of Milan, is to cook spaghetti in chicken stock, and then add anchovies, rye bread and lemon. «There’s the fat from the chicken broth, the roundness and sapidity of the anchovies, and the sourness of lemon. It’s as if we mixed the sea and the hills of my beloved Riccione with the universe of popular Milanese cuisine». A journey that starts poor in Milan and becomes gradually rich on the road to Romagna.

Spaghetti from Riccione to Milan

Recipe for one person

Ingredients
70 g spaghetti
Gerci Nocellara extra virgin olive oil to taste
1 unpeeled garlic clove
2 l chicken stock
7 anchovies from the sea of Cantabria
rye breadcrumbs to taste
1 slice of organic lemon
Grated lemon zest using a Microplane and lemon juice

Method
Make a classic chicken stock with celery, carrot, onion, a hen, a small piece of beef and a little salt. Simmer for at least 4 hours. Strain the broth and bring to the boil.

Cook the spaghetti al dente (around 9 minutes). In a pan, brown an unpeeled garlic clove with the oil, add some broth and remove the garlic. Drain the spaghetti and cook them in the pan, so they release the starch. Mix with the anchovies cut into pieces, the breadcrumbs, the lemon zest and the juice. Serve.

Daniele Patti’s total squid

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With this dish, Daniele Patti of restaurant Lo Scudiero in Pesaro had the idea of using three 100% Italian ingredients: spaghetti, the extract of chargrilled date tomatoes and squid. «We use the whole squid», he says, «the liver, marinated in soy sauce, the squid ink and the most precious part, which is lightly seared. The very strong iodine flavour reminds one of a walk at the fish market at dawn». There’s a sapid element too: «Powdered capers, a flavour from my childhood».

Total squid spaghetti

Recipe for 10 people

for the squid
10 seared squid from the Adriatic Sea
salt to taste
thyme to taste
extra virgin olive oil to taste
When the dish is ready to be served, sear the previously cut squid (seasoned with oil, salt and thyme) with the fry top.

700 g super spaghettoni

for the clam water
400 g clams from the Adriatic Sea
500 g water
Soak the water in water and 3% salt. Then slam them, cook them in water for 20 minutes, strain and use the water as a base for the rest of the dish.

For the cream of refermented black garlic
300 g black garlic
water from the clams of the Adriatic Sea
Using a hand blender, blend the black garlic with the clam water so as to make a cream that we’ll use for the sauce at the bottom of the dish.

for the mousse of barbequed tomatoes
300 g date tomatoes
1 sprig of fresh thyme
6 unpeeled garlic cloves
salt
pepper
extra virgin olive oil
Halve the tomatoes, season then with salt, pepper and oil and thyme and cook them on the embers. Once they are nicely smoked and roasted, roll them on a baking tin and dry them in the oven for one hour at 100°C. Once dried, blend and strain, put the mixture in a pastry bag, which will help in adding it when the dish is ready to be served.

For the squid liver mayonnaise
4 very fresh squid livers with soy sauce to taste
1 sliced medium sized potato boiled in water and olive oil
peanut oil
Marinate the squid liver in lots of soy sauce for around one hour. Using a cylinder glass and a hand blender, blend the liver. Add the potato first, the olive oil and then, finally to make it lighter, whisk in the peanut oil. Put the sauce in a container and use at room temperature.

for the powdered capers

100 g desalted capers, dehydrated in the oven at 100°C for 2 hours, blended until they are powdered.

aromatic herbs
10 leaves of cappuccina herb
10 wild fennel leaves
10 sorrel leaves

for the sauce at the bottom of the dish
Extra virgin olive oil
Squid ink
Fresh chilli pepper
blended white onion
cream of black garlic
clam water

In a pan, brown the white onion with oil and fresh chilli pepper. Add the cream of black garlic with clam water, remove the chilli pepper and add the squid ink. Meanwhile, cook the spaghetti al dente in lots of salted water, finish the cooking in the pan. Serve with the squid mayonnaise. On the bottom of the dish, place the spaghetti, the seared squid, the barbequed tomato mousse, add the herbs the wild fennel and the powdered capers and serve.

Di Pasquale and pasta before the dessert

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Enzo Di Pasquale, chef at Bistrot 900 in Giulianova (Teramo), another new appearance in the Guida ai Ristoranti di Identità Golose, doesn’t organise his menu in the classic way, with starters, first courses, mains and desserts. He only has two tasting menus, with 4/5 and 7 courses.

These particular spaghetti arrive at the end of the tasting menu: «To be precise», says the 32-year old chef form Teramo, «right before the dessert because the flavour is very intense, the result of the sweet and mineral notes of beetroot which, if simply reduced after juicing them, are added to the spaghetti halfway through the cooking»

Spaghetti in beetroot juice, curry sauce and coconut

Recipe for 4 people

Ingredients
300 g beetroot
200 g spaghetti
1/2 l vegetal stock
300 g coconut milk
1 tablespoon curry powder

Method
Add the coconut milk to the vegetal stock so as to obtain a thick sauce. Finally add the curry and set aside. Meanwhile, cook the spaghetti in boiling water for 5 minutes, reduce the beetroot juice and finish cooking the spaghetti after adding the juice. Place on a dish and finish with the curry sauce.

Crisci redesigns spaghetti with walnuts

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With this dish, Alfonso Crisci of La Taverna Vesuviana in San Gennaro Vesuviano (Naples) gives a new interpretation of a classic Christmas dish: spaghetti with walnuts. «In the past», he says, «walnuts were the emblem of agriculture’s contribution to our food, like nuts in general, something precious meant for special occasions. By adding rockfish and broccoli rabe I enriched the dish with new flavours and stronger colours. A nice appearance and rich flavours are two of the aspects I pay the greatest attention to in every dish».

Tagliatelle with rockfish water, broccoli rabe and powdered walnuts

Recipe for 4 people

Ingredients
250 g tagliatelle 
80 g chopped walnuts
100 g Parmigiano Reggiano
200 g broccoli rabe from Bari
100 g extra virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove
250 g rockfish
1 celery stalk
1 carrot
1 onion 

Method
Prepare the rockfish water by placing celery, carrot, onion and rockfish in a deep pot. Boil for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, sauté a garlic clove, brown the previously blanched broccoli rabes and some of the chopped walnuts. Add a ladle of rockfish water.

Strain the rockfish water and use it as a court-buillon to cook the pasta. Once cooked, mix it with the broccoli, add a drop of oil and Parmigiano Reggiano. Finish the dish by putting some broccoli tops and powdered walnuts on top.

Maccheroni with fake white ragù by Ambrosino

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Who said pasta must be a triumph of roundness and sapidity? The chef from Procida (Naples), a fan of sour flavours, opposes this law of Italian cuisine. In Maccheroni, yellow miso, lemon balm, ferfellone (dry sweet pepper, originally from Abruzzo), Marco Ambrosino of 28 Posti in Milan «prepared a white ragù without using animal proteins. It’s based on the idea, shared by all my dishes, of creating a result that differs from the sum of the ingredients used».

Ingletti: a variation on the theme of orecchiette

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Giovanni Ingletti of Taverna del Porto in Tricase (Lecce) created a variation on orecchiette, an emblem of Apulian cuisine among first courses, whose first records date back to the 16th century. «In this recipe», says the chef, «we use fusilli, a durum wheat pasta, cut in bronze and dried at low temperature». This way you make a traditional farmers’ dish, simple but with a unique and strong flavour.

Fusilli, turnips, anchovies and stracciatella

Recipe for 4 people

Ingredients
4 anchovy fillets
1 garlic clove
500 g turnip tops
100 g stracciatella
350 g orecchiette
blue fin fish fumet

For the decoration
turnip tops
4 boneless and seared anchovies
toasted breadcrumbs
chilli pepper

Method
Prepare the fumet of blue fin fish to be later used to add aroma and flavour and cook the fusilli. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Meanwhile clean the turnip tops, taking the inner leaves and the broccoli. Clean, rinse and then boil them enough to soften the stalks, then create a cream with a hand blender, adding oil aromatised with garlic, keeping aside enough broccoli for the decoration.

Pour the oil in a pot, with a crushed unpeeled garlic clove, the anchovy fillets (without the oil in which they were preserved). Mix so as to melt the anchovies. When ready, remove the garlic, add the cream of turnips and the fumet of blue tailed fish.

Sergeev mixes sea lemons and Siberian pine nuts

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Nikita Sergeev is the chef of Russian origins at the helm of restaurant L’Arcade in Porto San Giorgio, Fermo. This dish is a new entry in his late-autumn/early-winter menu. «The idea», he says, «came from tasting sea lemons: delicious, of course, but also strong in flavour, and they have an intense aroma that brings a breeze of iodine. The cream of Siberian pine nuts adds fatness, while the extract of maritime pine tree, with its natural tannins and intense acidity, contributes in making everything less fat».

Spaghettini, pine nuts, maritime pine tree and sea lemon

Recipe for 4 people

Ingredients
200 g spaghettini
100 g Siberian pine nuts
150 ml sparkling water
8 sea lemons
50 g extract of maritime pine needles
60 g pecorino romano
salt
extra virgin olive oil from Ascolana Tenera olives

Method
Put the pine nuts in a vacuum bag, add the sparkling water and seal with 100% vacuum. Leave in the fridge overnight. After this time, pour the content in a Termomix and blend. Once emulsified, sift and set aside the resulting smooth cream.

Process the maritime pine needles in the Green Star and keep the resulting extract aside. Open the sea lemons, remove the meat and keep the water aside. Cook the pasta al dente then cream it in a bowl with a lukewarm pine nut cream, extra virgin olive oil from Tenera Ascolana olives, the pine needle juice, and the meat from the sea lemons. Serve lukewarm.

Serve on a hot plate adding some grated Pecorino Romano on top.