With his piece opening this issue of Identità di Pasta, Riccardo Felicetti reminded me of how pasta, basically in all of its shapes, has no part in the history of Milan. Andrea Ribaldone’s Spaghettone Milano is from 2015, from Expo Milano. As for Spaghetti alla Milanese, theyhave a long past, but their origins are hardly Milanese: they’re Sicilian, a sort of Pasta alla Normawith sardines preserved in salt, instead of fresh.

Then Gualtiero Marchesi played his role, some ten years ago, with his Spaghetti alla Milanese, unknown to most, basically pasta with butter and grana padano or parmigiano, parsley and lemon zest. Simple but hardly easy. They hint at Rice and parsley, a dignified poverty of flavours.

From now to the Olympic Games of 2026 we’ll hear, think and cook all sorts of things.

Paolo Marchi
Newsletter curated by Gabriele Zanatta, translated by Slawka G. Scarso
(photo credits Brambilla/Serrani, OnStage Studio, Zanatta)

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Monograno Felicetti 
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Newsletter 75 del 17 july 2019

Dear {{NOME}},

With his piece opening this issue of Identità di Pasta, Riccardo Felicetti reminded me of how pasta, basically in all of its shapes, has no part in the history of Milan. Andrea Ribaldone’s Spaghettone Milano is from 2015, from Expo Milano. As for Spaghetti alla Milanese, theyhave a long past, but their origins are hardly Milanese: they’re Sicilian, a sort of Pasta alla Normawith sardines preserved in salt, instead of fresh.

Then Gualtiero Marchesi played his role, some ten years ago, with his Spaghetti alla Milanese, unknown to most, basically pasta with butter and grana padano or parmigiano, parsley and lemon zest. Simple but hardly easy. They hint at Rice and parsley, a dignified poverty of flavours.

From now to the Olympic Games of 2026 we’ll hear, think and cook all sorts of things.

Paolo Marchi
Newsletter curated by Gabriele Zanatta, translated by Slawka G. Scarso
(photo credits Brambilla/Serrani, OnStage Studio, Zanatta)

Felicetti and 3 spaghetti dishes for the 2026 Olympic Games

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A few days ago, as we all know, the International Olympic Committee assigned the 2026 Olympic Games to Milano-Cortina. Before then, we had only had three other Olympic Games in Italy: Cortina 1956, Rome 1960 and Torino 2006. For us it’s a great news, not only for the relationship that we have developed over these years with Milano and Cortina, but also because Val di Fiemme, where our pasta factory has had its headquarters for 111 years, will host all the competitions of Nordic skiing, ski jumping and Nordic combined.

For about ten days, the international spotlight will point at Val di Fiemme and Val di Fassa. Our task is to do even better than in the previous three editions of Nordic skiing world cups that we have organised here, in 1991, 2003 and 2013. The same applies to the food and the great chefs that we have in these areas.

If I were to choose some pasta dishes to represent the Olympic games, for sure I’d say Andrea Ribaldone’s Spaghettone Milano, born in the days of Identità Expo and now in the menu at Identità Golose’s Hub, with cream of saffron and a ragout of ossobuco in gremolada. For Cortina, Nido del Bosco from Ricky Gaspari of Sanbrite in Cortina d'Ampezzo (Belluno), another dish of spaghetti beautifully finished with pine oil. For our valleys, Kamut spaghetti, arctic char and hay from Alessandro Gilmozzi, chef at restaurant El Molin in Cavalese, a fantastic dish of which we’ll say more later in this issue. Three perfect prefaces to the emotions we’ll experience in 7 years’ time.

Riccardo Felicetti

Camanini, an irresistible climb, from pasta onwards

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For the World’s 50Best he’s one-to-watch, unanimously praised by journalists and restaurant colleagues, from Italy and abroad: there is no doubt this is the moment of Lido 84 and of Riccardo and Giancarlo Camanini. It’s a rather quiet climb, something that perfectly fits with a champion of humbleness. A climb that leveraged on pasta, a pillar in the Italian offer and in the offer of these two brothers by the lake.

While we’ve already said all there is to say about the Cacio e pepe in vescica, as reporters we risk being left behind because the leaps made by the chef from Bergamo with regards to dry pasta are truly ceaseless. Of a perfect meal, a couple of months ago, we recall the Spaghettini with sea urchins and black cardamom, ineffable in their balanced simplicity. And then the incredible similarity between the fusilli cooked al dente, and those that were cooked for 84 hours (here’s the story, from a couple of months ago).

But the dish that charmed us the most, in every way, is the Linguine one in the picture. The cooking is finished in a soup of cuttlefish and the bizarre colour is given by the cabbage, marinated in vinegar made with Groppello wine. A triumph of flavours from the sea, by the lake.

Antonio Tubelli’s timpanetto amalfitano

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«Tradition is your way of penetrating in the land where you were born, it’s what gives you the lymph to grow». This is just one of the cult quotes that hurricane Antonio Tubelli, chef at Baroq Art Bistrot in Naples, recently left as his heritage at the Hub in Via Romagnosi. In the menu for Identità Golose Milano his strong suit stood out, a crucial dish in the history of noble Neapolitan cuisine, a discipline he analyses with unique attention: Timpanetto Amalfitano.

«In this version - Tubelli explained – it loses some of the classic features of timballo. Which as a dish was an emblem of opulence, richness, the more ingredients there were, the richer the recipe, the better the welcome. In this case it becomes a lighter dish, not the king of the meal, but an interpretation of how pasta can be noble, based on essential flavours, typical of this season: Neapolitan aubergines, courgettes, date tomatoes, scamorza from Agerola». Marvellous.

Glowig flies with Eliche pasta with cheese, pepper and sea urchins

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The memory of the Eliche pasta with cheese and pepper and sea urchinsis still strong in the palate. This is one of the emblem dishes of multi-starred German chef Oliver Glowig, since September 2017 at the helm of Poggio le Volpi’s restaurant Barrique in Monte Porzio Catone (Rome). At Identità Golose’s Hub he presented a dish he’s been making for at least 8 years. Dry pasta is an inerasable heritage of the days he spent in Capri: «I always say that technically speaking I’m a son of Campania. In this case, the eliche pasta from Gerardo Di Nola are perfect because they keep the rich and voluptuous sauce. I’d like to remove it from the menu, but there’s no way I can manage».

What he said when Carlo Passera interviewed himis very interesting: «Italian cuisine is, first of all, based on products. What I mean is that it is based on excellent raw materials. This is a problem abroad, because it’s not always easy – in fact sometimes it’s quite impossible – to find suppliers capable of providing ingredients of these standards. And the perception people have of Italian cuisine abroad is often tamed by this: this has confined Italian food to a "popular" dimension, a step below, or perhaps two, compared to mostly French haute cuisine. Luckily, things are changing now».

Elio Sironi fishes in the Adriatic Sea

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«Simplicity is never banal if you give a perfect interpretation of it through ingredients that play a sincere main role, and are fully recognisable». This is what Elio Sironi, chef at restaurant Ceresio 7 in Milan said when he started his lesson at Identità di Pasta, a few days ago.

The topic of his talk: Spaghetti Monograno Felicetti Matt with scampi from Quarnero. It’s a dish born in the wake of a memory. It preserves the fresh aromas of chervil – similar to parsley, but with a much more delicate aroma – and citronella, the vibrating touch of ginger, an Asian memory and, of course, all with the Italian aromaof garlic.

He uses all of the scampi, and the final result shows it overtly: the spaghetti are placed on a lively bisque, cooked quickly, preserving the essence of the crustaceans’ carcasses emulsified with ginger, citronella and chervil. The meat is in the shape of a tartare that is cooked only slightly in the hot steam of the pasta, giving just a hint of a delicate red saline patina.

The dish is both the message and the messenger of the dialogue that the chef creates in the kitchen so as to reach the guests, making them take part in his emotions, in his memories: through an almost materic attachment to the ingredient, Sironi can channel them elsewhere, to the banks of the Adriatic Sea.

Marialuisa Iannuzzi

Gilmotti’s spaghetti go for a walk in the woods

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Kamut spaghetti Monograno Felicetti with firarctic char and hay. This is the dish on which Alessandro Gilmozzi, chef at restaurant El Molin in Cavalese (Trento), has based his lesson at Identità di Pasta, in the Hub in Via Romagnosi.

The chef recreated an ecosystem on the plate. Every single ingredient, starting from the pasta, contributes in creating, on the palate, an uncontrollable, autochthonous sense of nature. It is no coincidence that the idea for the dish came from the dialogue between the chef and those who experience the Felicetti pasta factory daily, a dialogue which results in a simple and enlightening truth: the fir trees in the woods clean the air with which the pasta is dried, which preserves in its soul the aroma of the land where it is produced.

That same fir tree can also be found in the pesto sauce made with its gems, collected in this season and emulsified at a cold temperature with oil from Garda. How can you tell? The tannins of the fir tree, a sour but also round and balsamic note, made stronger by the essential oils that the chef makes from the discarded parts of the same gems. The water used for the boiling is only lightly salted (just 2 grams of salt per litre!) because all the salinity of the dish is enclosed in the arctic char roe. Indeed, salt is a useful ingredient, Gilmozzi explains, but it is not essential when cooking pasta which already enjoys its natural minerality.

The butter melts in the pan, the spaghetti are tossed in the water. Now one only needs to toast the diced bread, made with a dough based on hay and milk: each mouthful reminds one of pastures, of the essence of wildflowers, of wood sorrel and wild camomile. This milk curdles fast, completely spontaneously, and it is its curdle, grassy and with a taste almost similar to goat’s milk, that starts the leavening action supported by the hay.

Marialuisa Iannuzzi

Clams and peppers at Nebbia

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It’s been little over a semester since Nebbia opened in Via Torricelli in Milan. The restaurant of Mattia GrilliFederico Fiore and Marco Marone is confirming the expectations with a transparent cuisine that does not implode, hoisted by its own petard, but focuses on raw materials, used with respect, and supported following the many international experiences of these guys.

These Spaghetti with clams and peppers are cooked in the classic way, except for the finishing: they prepare garlic, oil with clams (large, from Sardinia) and peperoni cruschifrom Matera, picked in November, dehydrated and then rehydrated in oil and fried. You will notice two types of powder: the one of the peperoni cruschi, and the one from the burnt shallot. An important tip: the cooking liquid, used in the mantecatura.

Stefano Cerveni, foodporn in Triennale

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We’ve always been respectful of chefs who work in silence, like Brescian Stefano Cerveni, who recently appeared in the kitchen at Terrazza Triennale, one of the many projects featuring him outside Due Colombe, his headquarters in Franciacorta – he recently started to work with GūD too, 5 lovely bars/take away places.

These Linguine cacio e pepe with tartare of red prawns, cooked with the resident chef of Terrazza, Matteo Ferrario, are as close as it gets to the concept of foodporn: voluptuous, sweet, fat, they’ll have your mouth watering just by looking at them. There’s the whim, more and more common in Italian fine dining, of putting a raw crustacean on top of a classic recipe.

Michele Cobuzzi: linguine made in Puglia

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There are infinite connections between Apulian cuisine and Milan. Think of Trani, the osterias scattered around town after the war, mostly specialised in serving wine by the glass. Eighty years later, it’s nice to see that Apulia can be very easily interpreted in a fine dining way. Linguine, garlic, oil, chilli pepper, chicory and lemon is a small, lively dish from Michele Cobuzzi, since September 2017 at the helm of restaurant Olio, a stone’s throw away from Porta Venezia in Milan. Here you have splendid raw materials, tradition, as well as the desire to go beyond tradition, but without overdoing it. Disclaimer: in the current menu there’s also a dish of inviting Linguine with five tomatoes and “la scarpetta”. An update is mandatory.

Cedroni: the nobleness of pasta explained to the Spanish

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Penne rigate, butter with sea urchins, dried scallops, wild herbs and chargrilled cuttlefish. This is one of the dishes that Moreno Cedroni presented at Encuentro de los Mares, first edition of the congress that took place a few days ago in Malaga, Cadiz and the surroundings. Title of the lesson: Recreando el Adriático, Recreating the Adriatic Sea, with special attention to the sea in front of Senigallia. There was a big focus on pasta: «When we go abroad», he said as reported by Carlo Passera, «it’s always nice to bring something that represents us, our emblem». In this case, penne pasta: which first of all you must eat one by one – not in mouthfuls, like in a trattoria – so you can appreciate the texture, the cooking, the flavour of the wheat and of the seasoning... Continue reading on www.identitagolose.com

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It’s always time for Monosilio’s Carbonara

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It’s been over two months now, it’s terribly hot, but one can still feel the pleasant effect of the Carbonara from Luciano Monosilio, chef at Luciano Cucina Italiana in Rome, who spent 4 days in April in Via Romagnosi. There’s a reason why Niccolò Vecchia’s article Le regole d'oro per fare una Carbonara perfetta, how to make the perfect Carbonara, has recently been the most popular article.